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Sunday, August 2, 2020 | History

4 edition of Fertility decline in Africa found in the catalog.

Fertility decline in Africa

Etienne Van de Walle

Fertility decline in Africa

assessment and prospects

by Etienne Van de Walle

  • 192 Want to read
  • 34 Currently reading

Published by World Bank in Washington, D.C .
Written in English

    Places:
  • Africa, Sub-Saharan.
    • Subjects:
    • Fertility, Human -- Africa, Sub-Saharan.,
    • Birth control -- Africa, Sub-Saharan.

    • Edition Notes

      Includes bibliographical references (p. 50-63).

      StatementEtienne van de Walle and Andrew D. Foster.
      SeriesWorld Bank technical paper,, no. 125., Africa Technical Department series, World Bank technical paper ;, no. 125., World Bank technical paper.
      ContributionsFoster, Andrew D., 1961-
      Classifications
      LC ClassificationsHB1071.A3 V36 1990
      The Physical Object
      Paginationx, 63 p. ;
      Number of Pages63
      ID Numbers
      Open LibraryOL1878900M
      ISBN 100821316001
      LC Control Number90039266

      The South Africa Census and the Demographic and Health Survey provide the first widely available and nationally representative demographic data on South Africa since Using these data, this paper describes the South African fertility decline from to Having identified and adjusted for several errors in the Census. Africa's unique fertility transition: John Bongaarts: – Fertility decline patterns and scenarios of future fertility change in sub-Saharan Africa: Ann Biddlecom, Patrick Gerland, and Vladimira Kantorova: – Discussion: Jacob Adetunji: Session 2: a.m.– p.m. The Consequences of African Fertility Trends.

        Patterns of Fertility Decline and the Impact of Alternative Scenarios of Future Fertility Change in sub‐Saharan Africa. Patrick Gerland; Ann Biddlecom; Vladimíra Kantorová; Pages: ; First Published: 06 December   Yet our knowledge of the decline is scattered in numerous publications, making sources difficult to find. This bibliography provides a guide to the literature on fertility decline in Latin America, Asia, and Sub-Saharan Africa. It will be an invaluable asset for population experts and students wishing to do research on fertility decline.

        But in , the U.N. predicted that instead, the fertility rate in Africa by would be about children per woman. “This upward trend in forecast population stems from the fact that U.N. Our new book, The Global Spread of Fertility Decline: Population, Fear, and Uncertainty (Yale University Press, ) analyzes these trends and the demographic, political and economic consequences and uncertainties as low fertility has become a global phenomenon. Like other facets of globalization, low fertility rates are by no means universal.


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Fertility decline in Africa by Etienne Van de Walle Download PDF EPUB FB2

Fertility Decline In Africa book. Read reviews from world’s largest community for readers. The study analyzes the links between family planning programs, contraceptive prevalence and fertility trends in sub-Saharan Africa.

It is based on case studies of countries with demographic surveys. The study reveals a variety of situations. Some countries have completed their fertility transition, while others have reduced their fertility level rapidly in urban areas, but less so in rural by: 1. Researchers at the University of Washington's Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation showed the global fertility rate nearly halved to in - and their study, published in the Lancet.

The future pace of fertility decline in sub-Saharan Africa is the main determinant of future world population growth and will have massive implications for Africa and the rest of the world, not least through international migration pressure and difficulties in meeting the sustainable development goals.

In this context, there have been concerns about recent stalls in the fertility decline in Cited by: 6. Post-Covid, fertility will plausibly decline due to economic uncertainty and increased childcare burdens worldwide, especially in high-income countries, say.

The greatest fertility decline in sub-Saharan Africa over the past 40 years has occurred in Botswana, where ambitious family planning programs were established after the country gained independence in Fifty years ago, the average Botswanan woman had an average of seven children.

Now, she has fewer than three. While the populations of 40 low-fertility countries are projected to be smaller by mid-century, some 25 high-fertility countries, nearly all in Africa, are expected to see their populations more than double by For most countries, sustained below-replacement fertility rates promise population decline.

Africa’s population is growing fast: faster than the United Nations expected, and faster than some demographers can adequately explain. This has raised concerns among some commentators, particularly non-African elites, that Africa’s birth rate is too high, even unusually high.

President Emmanuel Macron, who is childless, previously said that Africa’s poverty was thanks to its high birth. main factor in fertility decline. It is almost universally acknowledged that urban fertility is lower than rural fertility, except in the very poorest urban slum areas.

on the surface, this would appear to be attributable to 1. Hummel et al. () 2. The paper discusses how to characterize the end of the first fertility transition in South Africa.

For the country as a whole, fertility decline has been steady since the ’s and reached a plateau around a Total Fertility Rate (TFR) equal to children per woman in the late ’s. Components of unexpected fertility decline in Sub-Saharan Africa. Calverton, MD: Macro International, Inc., [] (OCoLC) Document Type: Book: All Authors / Contributors: Ann Klimas Blanc; Prosper V Poukouta; Macro International.

Institute for Resource Development. Demographic and. Fertility in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) countries, with the exception of Armenia, Georgia, Cyprus, and Israel, was high for some time during the second half of the twentieth century.

However, all 26 MENA countries studied here experienced fertility decline of varying onset and magnitude. John Charles "Jack" Caldwell AO (8 December – 12 March ) was a leading demographer, particularly in the fields of fertility transition and health transition.

He researched extensively in Africa, South Asia and Southeast Asia since He had a significant impact on demographic teaching, research and policy formulation. By John McKeown. Empty Planet moves confidently from an optimistic premise to unwarranted has been reviewed favourably by Steven Pinker, The Wall Street Journal and the New Statesman, among premise is that world population will peak far lower and sooner than the UN forecasts, and that because of a faster-than-expected decline in fertility rates rather.

After 35 years of fertility decline, women in sub-Saharan Africa were still having, on average, 75 per cent as many children as they were when fertility was at its peak. In the three other regions, after 35 years of fertility decline, fertility was below half its peak level.

Changing the Narrative on Fertility Decline in Africa. Today, Africa has the world’s highest fertility rates. On average, women in Sub-Saharan Africa have about five children over their reproductive lifetime, compared to a global average of ch shows that the “demographic transition,” the name for the change from high death and fertility rates to lower death and.

Fertility decline in Africa: assessments and prospects (English) Abstract. Fertility in Africa remains the highest in the world, the average total fertility rate for the continent is about children per woman.

So far little evidence is found of the beginning of a sustained and irreversible fertility decline. FERTILITY DESIRES. High demand for children is typical in sub-Saharan countries, Casterline noted.

He explored trends in fertility desires there in comparison with those in other regions, and considered the implications for fertility decline in Africa. Countries in sub-Saharan Africa experienced slightly higher pre-transitional levels of fertility, had a much later onset of transition, and have transitioned at a much slower pace.

Fertility rates in the region declined by 37 percent between andmuch less than the 61 percent decline in Asia and Latin America over the same period.

The map of declines in suggests that the observed decline in minority fertility through almost certainly continued in In terms of change in age-adjusted fertility, the sharpest declines in births have been in Arizona, where fertility has fallen from births per woman into an estimated in.

Additional Physical Format: Online version: Van de Walle, Etienne, Fertility decline in Africa. Washington, D.C.: World Bank, © (OCoLC)The average fertility rate in South Africa is on the decline, in line with global trends, and couples unable to conceive after a year of trying should seek help from a specialist, says a leading urogynaecologist.

A United Nations report notes that fertility rates in South Africa for are projected at an average children per woman, slightly lower than the global average of about This volume summarizes the major findings of the Princeton European Fertility Project.

The Project, begun inwas a response to the realization that one of the great social revolutions of the last century, the remarkable decline in marital fertility in Europe, was still poorly understood. Originally published in